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On this trip to see my dad, he showed me my grandfather’s prints from his time stationed in Japan. The album of b/w 8x10 prints speaks to the tender connections he shared with the local community. He had all of the captions written in Japanese. I can’t wait to see what they say. And what if I could someday meet the children in some of the photos? They are likely grandparents themselves now. I am moved. I am inspired. #savefamilyphotos #mygrandfathersphotos #my253life Thanks, jesse_michener http://ift.tt/1mAzuFm @savefamilyphotos

On this trip to see my dad, he showed me my grandfather’s prints from his time stationed in Japan. The album of b/w 8x10 prints speaks to the tender connections he shared with the local community. He had all of the captions written in Japanese. I can’t wait to see what they say. And what if I could someday meet the children in some of the photos? They are likely grandparents themselves now. I am moved. I am inspired. #savefamilyphotos #mygrandfathersphotos #my253life Thanks, jesse_michener http://ift.tt/1mAzuFm @savefamilyphotos

I got flowers from this lady for Jerry’s grave. She said that she wants to take care of this grave. A very nice lady. Luxembourg, Germany

#wwii #ww2 #worldwar2 #savefamilyphotos #vintagephotos #vintagephoto #oldphotos #oldphoto #oldfamilyphotos Thanks, grandpascamera http://ift.tt/1naeavj @savefamilyphotos

I got flowers from this lady for Jerry’s grave. She said that she wants to take care of this grave. A very nice lady. Luxembourg, Germany

#wwii #ww2 #worldwar2 #savefamilyphotos #vintagephotos #vintagephoto #oldphotos #oldphoto #oldfamilyphotos Thanks, grandpascamera http://ift.tt/1naeavj @savefamilyphotos

#takemebacktuesday -
This weekend the Craig branch of my family will gather for our annual family reunion. I have been attending since I was a baby. Every July my grandfather and his siblings, aunts, uncles and cousins gathered on the Saturday closest to my great grandfather’s birthday. This year we are gathering on the 120th anniversary of Great Grandpa’s birth. 
Great Grandma and Grandpa Craig are pictured here with their kids plus one more, a neighbor girl. They were poor farmers living in rural Southern Illinois. Great Grandpa was a veteran of WWI. I wonder what life was like returning to his country roots after spending more than a year in France. I remember him in his later years, and I remember his laugh the most. He had a great sense of humor. 
Pictured here:
Agnes and Alonzo Craig Family

Back row: Juanita, Agnes (Toler), Charles, Rollie (my grandpa) and Alonzo Craig

Front row: Helen Craig, neighbor girl, Evelyn Craig and Hollie Craig

Grand Uncles Hollie and Charles are the only members of this family still with us. I’m looking forward to seeing both of them and hearing their stories about the good old days. 
#family #savefamilyphotos #familyalbum #genealogy #ancestry #craigfamily #craig Thanks, jenlynne26 http://ift.tt/1mzFpdy @savefamilyphotos

#takemebacktuesday -
This weekend the Craig branch of my family will gather for our annual family reunion. I have been attending since I was a baby. Every July my grandfather and his siblings, aunts, uncles and cousins gathered on the Saturday closest to my great grandfather’s birthday. This year we are gathering on the 120th anniversary of Great Grandpa’s birth.
Great Grandma and Grandpa Craig are pictured here with their kids plus one more, a neighbor girl. They were poor farmers living in rural Southern Illinois. Great Grandpa was a veteran of WWI. I wonder what life was like returning to his country roots after spending more than a year in France. I remember him in his later years, and I remember his laugh the most. He had a great sense of humor.
Pictured here:
Agnes and Alonzo Craig Family

Back row: Juanita, Agnes (Toler), Charles, Rollie (my grandpa) and Alonzo Craig

Front row: Helen Craig, neighbor girl, Evelyn Craig and Hollie Craig

Grand Uncles Hollie and Charles are the only members of this family still with us. I’m looking forward to seeing both of them and hearing their stories about the good old days.
#family #savefamilyphotos #familyalbum #genealogy #ancestry #craigfamily #craig Thanks, jenlynne26 http://ift.tt/1mzFpdy @savefamilyphotos

My Mom’s Dad, looking pretty badass. He was Polish, so he was fighting for not only the US, but also against the genocide of his own people.

My grandfather’s name was John J. Parsick. He was born in Pennsylvania in 1923 to Polish immigrants.

He served in the European theater and was headed for Japan, but they dropped the bombs.

He met his wife in Pine Bluff, Arkansas after the war and they settled in Baltimore Maryland, where he worked for Glenn L. Martin Company his whole post-war life, right up until retirement.

He passed away on February 8, 2014. ~shared by @anthonymaans

#savefamilyphotos #familyhistory #ancestry #ancestors #familytree #oldphotos #oldpictures #familysearch Thanks, savefamilyphotos http://ift.tt/1rnxNRQ @savefamilyphotos

My Mom’s Dad, looking pretty badass. He was Polish, so he was fighting for not only the US, but also against the genocide of his own people.

My grandfather’s name was John J. Parsick. He was born in Pennsylvania in 1923 to Polish immigrants.

He served in the European theater and was headed for Japan, but they dropped the bombs.

He met his wife in Pine Bluff, Arkansas after the war and they settled in Baltimore Maryland, where he worked for Glenn L. Martin Company his whole post-war life, right up until retirement.

He passed away on February 8, 2014. ~shared by @anthonymaans

#savefamilyphotos #familyhistory #ancestry #ancestors #familytree #oldphotos #oldpictures #familysearch Thanks, savefamilyphotos http://ift.tt/1rnxNRQ @savefamilyphotos

Happy birthday, mom. You would have been 71 today and that blows my mind, because in my memory you will never be a day over 57. What’s weird though, is that your identical twin sis is still here, having her birthday today and missing you something terrible. Crazy that I can see what you would look like when I look at her. The good news is you haven’t aged a bit in my eyes. ❤️ #melindamartin #omgthosepigtails! #youusedtosignyournameonschoolpics #missyourhandwriting #savefamilyphotos Thanks, carriegeddie http://ift.tt/1yQutB2 @savefamilyphotos

Happy birthday, mom. You would have been 71 today and that blows my mind, because in my memory you will never be a day over 57. What’s weird though, is that your identical twin sis is still here, having her birthday today and missing you something terrible. Crazy that I can see what you would look like when I look at her. The good news is you haven’t aged a bit in my eyes. ❤️ #melindamartin #omgthosepigtails! #youusedtosignyournameonschoolpics #missyourhandwriting #savefamilyphotos Thanks, carriegeddie http://ift.tt/1yQutB2 @savefamilyphotos

Buddy Jerry’s grave. Buried in Luxembourg, Germany. (written on the back of the photo) 
I have serveral photos from this time so I’m going to try something a bit different and run them as a series this week. Since I could read his name and ASN, I did some research and found the following.

Jerome L. Gorres
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Staff Sergeant Jerome L. Gorres (ASN: 37302824), United States Army, for gallantry in action while serving with the 35th Infantry Division, in action in the vicinity of ****, France, on 21 November 1944. Sergeant Gorres, a platoon guide, assumed command of all available men in his platoon after a squad leader and second in command became casualties and in the absence of the platoon leader, reorganized his unit in the face of heavy enemy fire and led them forward about seventy-five yards until pinned down by direct fire from an enemy machine gun emplacement to the front. Rather than risk the lives of his men, Sergeant Gorres charged the enemy position alone, firing his rifle from the hip. He accounted for two of the three enemy crew members, jumped into the emplacement and killed the third German with his bayonet. He then led his troops into the village of ****, established security positions, then organized and supervised a hand-carrying supply detail to replenish the ration, ammunition and water supply of the troops in the village. Sergeant Gorres’ gallantry, tactical knowledge and intrepid leadership reflect the highest credit upon his character as a soldier.
General Orders: Headquarters, 35th Infantry Division, General Orders No. 59 (December 31, 1944)
Action Date: November 21, 1944
Service: Army
Rank: Staff Sergeant
Division: 35th Infantry Division
http://ift.tt/1wQOfcO

#wwii #ww2 #worldwar2 #savefamilyphotos #vintagephotos #vintagephoto #oldphotos #oldphoto #oldfamilyphotos Thanks, grandpascamera http://ift.tt/1wQOfcR @savefamilyphotos

Buddy Jerry’s grave. Buried in Luxembourg, Germany. (written on the back of the photo)
I have serveral photos from this time so I’m going to try something a bit different and run them as a series this week. Since I could read his name and ASN, I did some research and found the following.

Jerome L. Gorres
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Staff Sergeant Jerome L. Gorres (ASN: 37302824), United States Army, for gallantry in action while serving with the 35th Infantry Division, in action in the vicinity of ****, France, on 21 November 1944. Sergeant Gorres, a platoon guide, assumed command of all available men in his platoon after a squad leader and second in command became casualties and in the absence of the platoon leader, reorganized his unit in the face of heavy enemy fire and led them forward about seventy-five yards until pinned down by direct fire from an enemy machine gun emplacement to the front. Rather than risk the lives of his men, Sergeant Gorres charged the enemy position alone, firing his rifle from the hip. He accounted for two of the three enemy crew members, jumped into the emplacement and killed the third German with his bayonet. He then led his troops into the village of ****, established security positions, then organized and supervised a hand-carrying supply detail to replenish the ration, ammunition and water supply of the troops in the village. Sergeant Gorres’ gallantry, tactical knowledge and intrepid leadership reflect the highest credit upon his character as a soldier.
General Orders: Headquarters, 35th Infantry Division, General Orders No. 59 (December 31, 1944)
Action Date: November 21, 1944
Service: Army
Rank: Staff Sergeant
Division: 35th Infantry Division
http://ift.tt/1wQOfcO

#wwii #ww2 #worldwar2 #savefamilyphotos #vintagephotos #vintagephoto #oldphotos #oldphoto #oldfamilyphotos Thanks, grandpascamera http://ift.tt/1wQOfcR @savefamilyphotos

#mcm#wcm 
My beautiful brother Jorge Ponte and my gorgeous sister Alexandra Ponte. They were beautiful children and today beautiful adults.they did have a important roll on my growing and a strong impact on my mother intuition. They were the first babies I interact , the first diaper change, the first feeding bottles, the first frustrations about a crying babie.every second I spend with these two  were a mix of learning and growing. Thank u so much Thanks, mariavidinha http://ift.tt/1yQhnnh @savefamilyphotos

#mcm#wcm
My beautiful brother Jorge Ponte and my gorgeous sister Alexandra Ponte. They were beautiful children and today beautiful adults.they did have a important roll on my growing and a strong impact on my mother intuition. They were the first babies I interact , the first diaper change, the first feeding bottles, the first frustrations about a crying babie.every second I spend with these two were a mix of learning and growing. Thank u so much Thanks, mariavidinha http://ift.tt/1yQhnnh @savefamilyphotos

My mother was from Corfu.
Here she must have been about 17 with my grandfather. 
She married my father at 17 and was devoted to her family and our beautiful home. 
She went too soon and I miss her desperately, we would talk for hours like we hadn’t talked for years x 
#family#reminiscing 
#savefamilyphotos
#motherlylove Thanks, raphaellarose http://ift.tt/1n4hdFm @savefamilyphotos

My mother was from Corfu. Here she must have been about 17 with my grandfather. She married my father at 17 and was devoted to her family and our beautiful home. She went too soon and I miss her desperately, we would talk for hours like we hadn’t talked for years x #family#reminiscing #savefamilyphotos #motherlylove Thanks, raphaellarose http://ift.tt/1n4hdFm @savefamilyphotos

My grandfather, Harvey L. Strelzin, was born in Brooklyn in 1906, the son of Russian Jews who fled turmoil in the Ukraine. He grew up in a tenement on Grand Street in Williamsburg.

Overcoming polio, he found work in a restaurant while seeking education. He graduated from City College, and attended Brooklyn Law School. In his 20s, he entered local politics, aligning with the powerhouse Seneca Democratic Club. He was appointed an Assistant Attorney General in 1933, and continued his law practice.

He made headlines in 1951 when he stopped a man from jumping from the Brooklyn Bridge. In 1955, Mayor Robert F. Wagner appointed Harvey the Chairman of the Board of Assessors of the City of New York. This photo, featuring Mayor Wagner and Harvey’s wife, Marie, was taken at City Hall when Harvey was sworn in.

Harvey’s role on the board helped him influence municipal improvements in communities that had been neglected. He excelled; one newspaper called Harvey “one of the most fastidious dressers” in government.

However, as the McClellan Committee in Washington investigated labor racketeering, Harvey’s name came up. Years before, he’d invested in a private garbage carting firm with an individual who was later linked with crime syndicates. The business partnership was dissolved, but in 1957 Harvey was called to testify. Despite committee staffers’ misgivings about Harvey’s involvement, he was grilled by Robert F. Kennedy. Although nothing linked Harvey to wrongdoing, the publicity was enough to prompt Mayor Wagner to ask him to step down.

So Harvey returned to his law practice, earned a Doctorate from New York Law School, and from 1968 to 1980 served as a State Assemblyman. Colleagues called him the “Conscience of the Assembly,” and recalled that he scrutinized every pending bill, going so far as reclining in his hotel bathtub with legislation as reading material.

Into his mid 80s, Harvey was a judge in the Brooklyn Court of Claims. He died in December, 1993. ~shared by @mhermannphoto

#savefamilyphotos #vintagephotos #vintagephoto #oldphoto #oldfamilyphotos #familytree #foundphotos #classicphotos #classicphoto #oldphotos Thanks, savefamilyphotos http://ift.tt/1u7CF0I @savefamilyphotos

My grandfather, Harvey L. Strelzin, was born in Brooklyn in 1906, the son of Russian Jews who fled turmoil in the Ukraine. He grew up in a tenement on Grand Street in Williamsburg.

Overcoming polio, he found work in a restaurant while seeking education. He graduated from City College, and attended Brooklyn Law School. In his 20s, he entered local politics, aligning with the powerhouse Seneca Democratic Club. He was appointed an Assistant Attorney General in 1933, and continued his law practice.

He made headlines in 1951 when he stopped a man from jumping from the Brooklyn Bridge. In 1955, Mayor Robert F. Wagner appointed Harvey the Chairman of the Board of Assessors of the City of New York. This photo, featuring Mayor Wagner and Harvey’s wife, Marie, was taken at City Hall when Harvey was sworn in.

Harvey’s role on the board helped him influence municipal improvements in communities that had been neglected. He excelled; one newspaper called Harvey “one of the most fastidious dressers” in government.

However, as the McClellan Committee in Washington investigated labor racketeering, Harvey’s name came up. Years before, he’d invested in a private garbage carting firm with an individual who was later linked with crime syndicates. The business partnership was dissolved, but in 1957 Harvey was called to testify. Despite committee staffers’ misgivings about Harvey’s involvement, he was grilled by Robert F. Kennedy. Although nothing linked Harvey to wrongdoing, the publicity was enough to prompt Mayor Wagner to ask him to step down.

So Harvey returned to his law practice, earned a Doctorate from New York Law School, and from 1968 to 1980 served as a State Assemblyman. Colleagues called him the “Conscience of the Assembly,” and recalled that he scrutinized every pending bill, going so far as reclining in his hotel bathtub with legislation as reading material.

Into his mid 80s, Harvey was a judge in the Brooklyn Court of Claims. He died in December, 1993. ~shared by @mhermannphoto

#savefamilyphotos #vintagephotos #vintagephoto #oldphoto #oldfamilyphotos #familytree #foundphotos #classicphotos #classicphoto #oldphotos Thanks, savefamilyphotos http://ift.tt/1u7CF0I @savefamilyphotos